Dr. Rodriguez – Martin is a native Floridian. He has also completed more than 250 hours of continuing education in implantology, cosmetic dentistry & orthodontics.

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Dentist - Delray Beach,
2100 Lake Ida Road, Suite 2-A
Delray Beach, FL 33445
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Posts for: March, 2017

By Brilliant Smiles Dental
March 24, 2017
Category: Oral Health

Visiting the dentist regularly could actually be friendly to your wallet in the long run.preventative dentistry

Most people lead busy lives, so it may seem like no big deal to skip a visit or two to see your dentist, right? Wrong! Most people think that if they aren’t experiencing symptoms that routine visits aren’t important, but this couldn’t be more inaccurate. From the office of our Delray Beach, FL, dentist, Dr. Henry Rodriguez-Martin, find out why you shouldn’t skip those six-month exams if you value your time and your money.

Protect Your Smile for Life

These routine checkups happen for a reason. Every six months you come in for cleanings and exams. If you have a healthy smile it might seem as if that trip was a waste, but it certainly wasn’t. During your cleaning, we can remove plaque and tartar buildup with special instruments.

Tartar is hardened plaque that can lead to gum disease if it isn’t removed, and it’s not something that you can remove yourself with your at-home toothbrush. Even the best brushers miss plaque buildup here and there when brushing, but this can lead to decay. By removing dental plaque every six months we can protect your smile from cavities.

During these exams, our Delray Beach general dentist will also check for infections, oral cancer and a host of other dental problems. By detecting these issues at their earliest we can often treat them with simple, painless measures rather than time-consuming and arduous restorative treatments.

Coming in for Regular Care

These checkups could protect your smile. Preventive dentistry is better than finding out you need restorative treatment. If you want to keep that beautiful smile then you’ll want to put in a little effort now to gain a whole lot of benefits in the future.

By maintaining good oral hygiene between visits, coming in to visit us regularly and opting for preventive treatments like dental sealants or fluoride treatments, you can guarantee that you and your family’s smiles will be healthy for years to come.

Brilliant Smiles Dental prides itself on providing affordable dentistry to Delray Beach, FL. Remember, visiting us every six months for routine cleanings could be the difference between a healthy smile and one that needs a lot of dental treatments down the road. Which will you choose?


By Brilliant Smiles Dental
March 16, 2017
Category: Oral Health
JamieFoxxChipsaTooth-ThisTimebyAccident

Some people are lucky — they never seem to have a mishap, dental or otherwise. But for the rest of us, accidents just happen sometimes. Take actor Jamie Foxx, for example. A few years ago, he actually had a dentist intentionally chip one of his teeth so he could portray a homeless man more realistically. But recently, he got a chipped tooth in the more conventional way… well, conventional in Hollywood, anyway. It happened while he was shooting the movie Sleepless with co-star Michelle Monaghan.

“Yeah, we were doing a scene and somehow the action cue got thrown off or I wasn't looking,” he told an interviewer. “But boom! She comes down the pike. And I could tell because all this right here [my teeth] are fake. So as soon as that hit, I could taste the little chalkiness, but we kept rolling.” Ouch! So what's the best way to repair a chipped tooth? The answer it: it all depends…

For natural teeth that have only a small chip or minor crack, cosmetic bonding is a quick and relatively easy solution. In this procedure, a tooth-colored composite resin, made of a plastic matrix with inorganic glass fillers, is applied directly to the tooth's surface and then hardened or “cured” by a special light. Bonding offers a good color match, but isn't recommended if a large portion of the tooth structure is missing. It's also less permanent than other types of restoration, but may last up to 10 years.

When more of the tooth is missing, a crown or dental veneer may be a better answer. Veneers are super strong, wafer-thin coverings that are placed over the entire front surface of the tooth. They are made in a lab from a model of your teeth, and applied in a separate procedure that may involve removal of some natural tooth material. They can cover moderate chips or cracks, and even correct problems with tooth color or spacing.

A crown is the next step up: It's a replacement for the entire visible portion of the tooth, and may be needed when there's extensive damage. Like veneers, crowns (or caps) are made from models of your bite, and require more than one office visit to place; sometimes a root canal may also be needed to save the natural tooth. However, crowns are strong, natural looking, and can last many years.

But what about teeth like Jamie's, which have already been restored? That's a little more complicated than repairing a natural tooth. If the chip is small, it may be possible to smooth it off with standard dental tools. Sometimes, bonding material can be applied, but it may not bond as well with a restoration as it will with a natural tooth; plus, the repaired restoration may not last as long as it should. That's why, in many cases, we will advise that the entire restoration be replaced — it's often the most predictable and long-lasting solution.

Oh, and one more piece of advice: Get a custom-made mouthguard — and use it! This relatively inexpensive device, made in our office from a model of your own teeth, can save you from a serious mishap… whether you're doing Hollywood action scenes, playing sports or just riding a bike. It's the best way to protect your smile from whatever's coming at it!

If you have questions about repairing chipped teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Artistic Repair of Chipped Teeth With Composite Resin” and “Porcelain Veneers.”


By Brilliant Smiles Dental
March 01, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: air abrasion  
AirAbrasionAnAlternativetotheTraditionalDentalDrill

Drilling teeth is an essential part of repairing and restoring the damage caused by tooth decay. For generations dentists have relied on the dental drill with its rotating burr to remove decayed and damaged tooth material.

But while the dental drill is effective it also has its disadvantages. In the process of removing decayed material it inadvertently removes healthy structure near the target material. It often requires anesthesia to deaden the work area. And its noise and vibration are often unsettling to patients.

There is a growing alternative, though: air abrasion, a technology that's been around since the mid-20th Century. But recent advances in controlling the dust created by using abrasion, as well as new tooth-colored bonding materials to replace tooth structure, have sparked new interest among dentists and patients alike.

Also known as particle abrasion, this drill alternative uses a pressurized stream of fine particles to remove decayed material. Using a hand wand a dentist can precisely aim the stream of particles (usually aluminum oxide) to the specific areas of decay or softened material that need to be removed. As a result, it removes only a fraction of healthy tooth structure compared to traditional drilling. Air abrasion has also proven effective for removing staining without harming enamel.

Air abrasion also eliminates the sound and vibration associated with dental drills, and may not always require local anesthesia. On the other hand, it does have some limitations. For one, it's not as effective with larger cavities or working around older fillings. The tooth or teeth to be worked on must be carefully isolated from the rest of the mouth to keep the patient from swallowing the abrasive particles. And without a high-volume suction pump and good isolation protocols, the particles can produce something of a “sandstorm” in the treatment room.

But as air abrasion continues to advance, we may see improvements in these limitations. In a future time, the traditional dental drill may go the way of the horse and buggy.

If you would like more information on air abrasion as an alternative to drilling, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Air Abrasion Technology.”




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