Dr. Rodriguez – Martin is a native Floridian. He has also completed more than 250 hours of continuing education in implantology, cosmetic dentistry & orthodontics.

Read more about Henry Rodriguez Martin, DMD

Click Here

 

Dentist - Delray Beach,
2100 Lake Ida Road, Suite 2-A
Delray Beach, FL 33445
Find us

Find helpful information in our digital library.

Archive:

 

 

  

Posts for: July, 2015

By Brilliant Smiles Dental
July 30, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   bonding  
ARoyalFix

So you’re tearing up the dance floor at a friend’s wedding, when all of a sudden one of your pals lands an accidental blow to your face — chipping out part of your front tooth, which lands right on the floorboards! Meanwhile, your wife (who is nine months pregnant) is expecting you home in one piece, and you may have to pose for a picture with the baby at any moment. What will you do now?

Take a tip from Prince William of England. According to the British tabloid The Daily Mail, the future king found himself in just this situation in 2013. His solution: Pay a late-night visit to a discreet dentist and get it fixed up — then stay calm and carry on!

Actually, dental emergencies of this type are fairly common. While nobody at the palace is saying exactly what was done for the damaged tooth, there are several ways to remedy this dental dilemma.

If the broken part is relatively small, chances are the tooth can be repaired by bonding with composite resin. In this process, tooth-colored material is used to replace the damaged, chipped or discolored region. Composite resin is a super-strong mixture of plastic and glass components that not only looks quite natural, but bonds tightly to the natural tooth structure. Best of all, the bonding procedure can usually be accomplished in just one visit to the dental office — there’s no lab work involved. And while it won’t last forever, a bonded tooth should hold up well for at least several years with only routine dental care.

If a larger piece of the tooth is broken off and recovered, it is sometimes possible to reattach it via bonding. However, for more serious damage — like a severely fractured or broken tooth — a crown (cap) may be required. In this restoration process, the entire visible portion of the tooth may be capped with a sturdy covering made of porcelain, gold, or porcelain fused to a gold metal alloy.

A crown restoration is more involved than bonding. It begins with making a 3-D model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors. From this model, a tooth replica will be fabricated by a skilled technician; it will match the existing teeth closely and fit into the bite perfectly. Next, the damaged tooth will be prepared, and the crown will be securely attached to it. Crown restorations are strong, lifelike and permanent.

Was the future king “crowned” — or was his tooth bonded? We may never know for sure. But it’s good to know that even if we’ll never be royals, we still have several options for fixing a damaged tooth. If you would like more information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “Crowns and Bridgework.”


By Brilliant Smiles Dental
July 16, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Crowns  

Dental crowns improve the function and look of natural teeth that have been damaged.

Teeth work best when you have a full set. Speaking and eating can be made difficult due to the loss or damage of just one tooth. CrownsFortunately, the qualified team at Brilliant Smiles Dental Company in Delray Beach, Florida has a relatively simple solution to fix this problem: dental crowns. Here, Dr. Henry Rodriguez-Martin answers a few of the questions he often hears about crowns from his Delray Beach dental patients.

What are dental crowns?

Sometimes referred to as caps, crowns are made from porcelain, ceramic or metal. They provide a cover on top of a natural tooth that cannot sustain any further damage or decay. After your Delray Beach dentist Dr. Rodriguez-Martin has taken digital measurements of your tooth and the area surrounding it, your crowns will be made in a laboratory to look exactly like a natural tooth.

Why do I need a crown?

If decay has gone untreated, it may weaken a tooth so much that it cannot support a regular filling. Teeth whose surfaces show extensive wear may need to have their surfaces built up again. Crowns are also made to finish off a dental implant. 

Crowns also fill in the spaces left when a tooth is extracted. The large space can be subject to a variety of problems including decay and tooth shifting. When attached to the adjacent teeth that remain, crowns close these gaps to keep the rest of the natural teeth healthy.

How long do crowns last?

Crowns are fairly durable restorations, lasting between five and fifteen years, but Dr. Rodriguez-Martin has had patients at his Delray Beach dental practice who have had their crowns much longer by practicing excellent dental hygiene. Regular checkups at Brilliant Smiles Dental Company is also imperative to the life of your crown. 

Dental crowns help to maintain good dental health so the rest of your natural teeth will be protected. Talk to your Delray Beach dentist, Dr. Henry Rodriguez-Martin about how these useful restorations can keep you smiling for years to come.


By Brilliant Smiles Dental
July 15, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain  
TheTypeofToothPainYouHaveCouldbeTellingYouWhatsWrong

As with the rest of the body, tooth pain is an indication that something’s wrong. While the exact cause requires a dental exam, the location, quality and duration of the pain could narrow the possibilities. With that in mind, here are 3 types of tooth pain and what it might be telling you.

Sensitivity. Pain or discomfort when you eat or drink cold foods or bite down could mean you have a small area of decay in the tooth, a loose filling or an exposed root surface from gum recession. Dental work to repair a decayed tooth or filling could alleviate the pain; in the case of gum recession, you may need to reduce overaggressive brushing or seek treatment for periodontal (gum) disease, the two main causes of the condition.

Dull or lingering pain. A dull ache in the rear sinus area could indicate a problem with a back tooth — they share the same nerve pathways as the sinuses, so you may be feeling referred pain. In the case of lingering pain after eating or drinking something hot or cold, there may be decay within the inner pulp chamber of the tooth that’s damaging or even killing the nerve tissue. If so, a root canal treatment might be in order.

Sharp pain. That sudden, excruciating pain when you bite down could mean you’re experiencing advanced decay, a loose filling or possibly a cracked tooth. If the pain seems to radiate from the gums — and they’re swollen and sensitive — you may have developed an abscess brought on by periodontal (gum) disease. In all these cases, appropriate dental treatment like decay removal and filling, root canal treatment or plaque removal may be necessary, depending on the cause and extent of the problem.

Regardless of what kind of pain you’re feeling, you should see us as soon as possible — in many situations waiting will only make the problem worse. The sooner we discover the cause, the sooner we can begin the right treatment to solve the issue and alleviate your pain.

If you would like more information on the causes and treatment of tooth pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Pain? Don’t Wait!




Questions or Comments?
We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest or concern about our services.

(561) 272-2131